National Apprenticeship Week 2021

National Apprenticeship Week 2021

Level B1-B2

 

In this week’s blog we’re bringing attention to National Apprenticeship Week in the UK. An apprenticeship, as you may have learned from our Instagram post earlier this week, is a programme where you’re trained to do a job by someone with more experience, while being paid for it. An apprenticeship is a great step between education and a full-time job. It gives you the opportunity to learn your trade or profession step-by-step and slowly increase your responsibility.

 

What you do as an apprentice

 

What you do as an apprentice depends on your field of work. Generally, though, your apprenticeship will follow an established plan of instruction, just like an English course or any other guided-study programme. This combines practical training, in which you practise doing the skill that you’ve studied, and an educational curriculum. This includes following workplace procedures, learning health and safety regulations, updating training records, and completing tasks to gain a qualification.

 

In the UK there are different levels of apprenticeships for different sectors of work and experience. Level 2 apprenticeships are usually for young people (16 year-olds) in sectors like construction, planning, leisure, tourism and many others. This level is called “intermediate” and is equivalent to 5 GCSE passes (school leaving exams). Level 3 (Advanced Apprenticeships) are equal to 2 A Levels (exams done at the end of secondary school). The difference between Level 2 and 3 is that Level 3 apprenticeships give you the opportunity to develop work-based skills and are much more competitive to get. Levels 4-7 are degree-level apprenticeships, which are usually done alongside college and university study. There’s something for everyone and, through apprenticeships in the UK, anyone can get the training they need to get a great job.

 

How to find an apprenticeship

 

The British government does a great job of making apprenticeship opportunities public and easy to find. The place to start if you’re looking for an apprenticeship is: www.findapprenticeship.service.gov.uk. Here, you can find a programme that suits your education, field of work, and even location, wherever you are in London or the UK. Whether you want to work with your hands and become a plumber, electrician, or optician; or work as a business administrator, optician, or teacher, there’s an apprenticeship programme for you.

 

Ingla’s Programme

 

At Ingla we know that not everyone has enough money to take an English course, so we have our own apprenticeship programme for talented students. In exchange for an opportunity to use their skills in a professional environment, Inglans can get a big discount on their English lessons. Opportunities range from creative skills, like graphic design and video production, to office and administrative work. If you want to study English, and you want to gain experience working in London and becoming a professional, Ingla can find a way to help you.

Match the underlined words in the article to the definitions below

  1. (n.) Rules made and maintained by an authority
  2. (n.) The subjects in a course of study
  3. (adj.) Showing a strong desire to win or be more successful than others
  4. (n.) An established or official way of doing something; Steps you must go through to complete an action
  5. (n.) An area of activity or interest; A group of related or similar jobs
  6. (n.) An official document showing you have completed a course or programme of study
  1. Regulations (n.) Rules made and maintained by an authority
  2. Curriculum (n.) The subjects in a course of study
  3. Competitive (adj.) Showing a strong desire to win or be more successful than others
  4. Procedures (n.) An established or official way of doing something; Steps you must go through to complete an action
  5. Field of work (n.) An area of activity or interest; A group of related or similar jobs 
  6. Qualifications (n.) An official document showing you have completed a course or programme of study
  1. Do you have apprenticeship programmes in your country? How are they different or similar to the ones in the UK, as described in this article?
  2. What are the benefits and downsides of this type of training?
  3. Do you think practical or academic training is more useful? Why?
  4. In your field of work what does a person need to learn before becoming a full-time professional?
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